• 27 JAN 17
    • 0

    Vitamin A deficiency linked to Alzheimer’s disease

    "Alzheimer’s may begin in the womb because mums are short of crucial vitamin, scientists warn," the Daily Mirror reports. New research involving both mice and humans looked at the link between vitamin A deficiency, brain development and Alzheimer’s risk. Vitamin A helps boost the immune system and is mainly found in animal sources, including dairy, eggs, meat and oily

    • 26 JAN 17
    • 0

    UK survey finds around 1 in 13 women report pain during sex

    "Nearly 1 in 10 British women [7.5%] finds sex painful, according to a big study," BBC News reports. The study’s results highlight the arguably neglected issue of pain during sex – dyspareunia – which some women may be too embarrassed to seek treatment for. Researchers surveyed almost 7,000 sexually active women and found 7.5% reported pain

    • 26 JAN 17
    • 0

    New drug treatment for pancreatic cancer ‘extends survival’

    "Trial finds combination of pancreatic cancer drugs extends survival," The Guardian reports. The results of a trial that combined the use of two chemotherapy drugs has led to calls for this approach to become the new protocol for pancreatic cancer treatment. The trial showed people lived an average of 2.5 months longer if they took

    • 25 JAN 17
    • 0

    New insights into why breast cancer drugs fail for some women

    "Breast cancer drugs taken by thousands of women stop working because tumours ‘outsmart’ them," is the headline in The Sun. Around 70% of breast cancer cases are what are known as oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancers. This means the cancerous cells use the hormone oestrogen as a type of "fuel" to help them reproduce and spread. After

    • 24 JAN 17
    • 0

    Warning over ‘burnt toast chemical’ acrylamide’s cancer risk

    "Browned toast and potatoes are ‘potential cancer risk’, say food scientists," BBC News reports. The Food Standards Agency (FSA) has launched a campaign about the possible health risk of acrylamide; a chemical formed when starchy foods are subjected to a high temperature. The campaign is titled Go for Gold – a reference to the advice that when

    • 23 JAN 17
    • 0

    Youngest children in class ‘more likely to be given ADHD drugs’

    "Youngest children in class more likely to get ADHD medication, study says," The Guardian reports. The results of an Australian study have caused concerns that, in some cases, immature behaviour may be misinterpreted as evidence of a behavioural disorder. In a brief report, researchers found nearly 2% of 6-15-year-olds in Western Australia received a prescription for

    • 21 JAN 17
    • 0

    MRI scans could spare 25% of men from prostate biopsies

    "Every man with suspected prostate cancer should have an MRI scan," The Guardian reports. That is the conclusion of a study looking at how well MRI scans compare with the current practice of biopsies; removing sections of prostate tissue for analysis. Disadvantages of prostate biopsies include the fact that they can lead to a small

    • 20 JAN 17
    • 0

    Sitting down all day ‘may accelerate DNA ageing’

    "Women who lead a sedentary lifestyle have faster-ageing cells than those who exercise every day," BBC News reports. This research looked at telomeres – often likened to the caps at the end of shoelaces, they are made up of molecules that protect strands of chromosomes from "fraying". Telomeres shorten every time the genetic information in

    • 19 JAN 17
    • 0

    A third of adults treated for asthma ‘may not have the disease’

    "The great asthma myth: A third of those diagnosed don’t have the condition," reports the Mail Online. A study in Canada found about one-third of adults diagnosed with asthma in the past five years showed no signs of the condition on retesting. Asthma has become a common condition, and can cause serious illness or death

    • 19 JAN 17
    • 0

    Eating disorders in middle-aged women ‘common’

    "Eating disorders…affect a small but substantial number of women in their 40s and 50s," BBC News reports. While often regarded as a "disease of the young", a new survey suggests 3.6% of middle-aged women in the UK are affected by an eating disorder. Researchers also looked at childhood, parenting and personality risk factors associated with