• 01 JUN 17
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    Link between stress in pregnancy and ADHD unfounded

    "Stressed mothers-to-be face an increased risk of giving birth to a child who will develop ADHD or heart disease later in life," the Mail Online reports. However, the new study it is reporting on did not look at long-term outcomes in children, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), only at stress hormone levels during pregnancy.

    • 01 JUN 17
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    Parents’ phone addiction may lead to child behavioural problems

    “Is our smartphone addiction damaging our children?,” The Guardian asks, after publication of a recent study into “technoference” – when people switch their attention away from others to check their phone or tablet. The study, carried out in the US, involved more than 300 parents who reported on their use of digital technology, to see if

    • 31 MAY 17
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    Beta-blockers ‘useless’ for many heart attack patients, study reports

    "Many patients given beta blockers after a heart attack may not benefit from being on the drugs, suggesting they may be being overprescribed," The Guardian reports. Beta-blockers are drugs used to regulate the heart by making it beat more slowly and with less force. They are often used in people who have heart failure or are thought

    • 27 MAY 17
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    Fitness trackers’ calorie measurements are prone to error

    “Fitness trackers out of step when measuring calories, research shows,” The Guardian reports. An independent analysis of a number of leading brands found they were all prone to inaccurate recording of energy expenditure. Researchers recruited 60 participants to take part in a range of exercises while having their heart rate and number of calories burned

    • 26 MAY 17
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    Does meditation carry a risk of harmful side effects?

    "Meditation can leave you feeling even more stressed," the Daily Mail reports. The claim is prompted by a study of 60 practitioners of Buddhist meditation in the US which found they’d had a range of "challenging or difficult" experiences associated with the practice. However, it’s not clear how relevant the results are to the majority

    • 25 MAY 17
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    Expanding waistline linked to an increased risk of cancer

    "A pot belly is a red flag for cancer," reports the Mail Online after a new study found an increase in waist circumference carries similar risks for developing cancer as raised body mass index (BMI). The study used data from several European studies of more than 43,000 adults aged around 63, who were then followed

    • 24 MAY 17
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    ‘Chocolate good for the heart’ claims sadly too good to be true

    "Regularly tucking into a bar of chocolate may actually be good for us," reports the Mail Online. Researchers in Denmark say people who eat chocolate one to six times a week are less likely to get a heart condition called atrial fibrillation than those who eat it hardly at all (less than once a month).

    • 24 MAY 17
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    Just half a glass of wine a day may increase breast cancer risk

    "Just half a glass of wine a day ups the risk of breast cancer by nine per cent, experts warn," The Sun reports. A major report looking at global evidence found that drinking just 10g of alcohol a day – 1.25 units – was linked to an increased risk of breast cancer. The report was

    • 23 MAY 17
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    Dementia saliva testing ‘shows early promise’

    "Simple saliva test for dementia ‘shows promise’ in bid to diagnose the disease early," the Daily Mirror reports. This news is based on a laboratory study that took saliva samples from 12 healthy adults, nine adults with Alzheimer’s disease, and eight with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which is often seen as the stage just before

    • 20 MAY 17
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    Instagram ‘ranked worst for mental health’ in teen survey

    "Instagram is rated as the worst social media platform when it comes to its impact on young people’s mental health, a UK survey suggests," BBC News reports. The survey asked 1,479 young people aged 14-24 to score popular social media apps on issues such as anxiety, depression, loneliness, bullying, body image and "fear of missing