• 14 OCT 16
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    Antidepressants ‘double suicide risk’ says controversial study

    "Antidepressants could double the risk of feelings that could lead to suicide, according to a new study which has triggered furious rows," The Daily Telegraph reports. Critics have attacked the study as "fatally flawed" because researchers extrapolated certain side effects, such as anxiety, as being a risk factor for suicide. Researchers carried out an analysis of

    • 20 OCT 16
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    Anti-inflammatory arthritis drugs may help with depression

    "Arthritis pills could help beat depression," The Sun reports. A review of studies suggests anti-cytokine drugs, currently used to treat inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, could have a role in treating depression. Cytokines are proteins released by cells when the immune system is activated and are linked to inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis.

    • 28 SEP 16
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    Acne won’t extend your life, but might delay signs of ageing

    "Spotty teenagers may have the last laugh over their peers with perfect skin after research found that those who suffer from acne are likely to live longer," says The Telegraph online. But the report misunderstands the research findings, which were related to cell ageing, not length of life. The researchers state dermatologists have for many

    • 13 JAN 17
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    A pattern of brain activity may link stress to heart attacks

    "The effect of constant stress on a deep-lying region of the brain explains the increased risk of heart attack, a study in The Lancet suggests," BBC News reports. Research suggests that stress stimulates the amygdala. The amygdala is, in evolutionary terms, one of the oldest areas of the brain and has been linked to some

    • 18 OCT 16
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    A 10-minute walk after a meal ‘good for diabetes’

    "Short stroll after meals better for blood sugar than walks at other times," says The Daily Telegraph. The story is based on a study which aimed to see whether taking a 10-minute walk after a main meal resulted in lower blood glucose levels than a single 30-minute walk each day for people with type 2

    • 01 DEC 16
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    ‘Want to live longer? Try racquet sports’, recommends study

    "If you want to stave off death for as long as possible, you might want to reach for a tennis racquet," The Guardian reports. A study looking at the impact of individual sports on mortality found racquet sports reduced the risk of death by around 47%. Researchers also found reduced risks of death for people

    • 20 OCT 16
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    ‘Statins in a tube’: Could a new toothpaste prevent heart disease?

    "Brushing teeth thoroughly to remove plaque could help prevent heart attacks … by reducing inflammation," The Daily Telegraph reports. A study found that "Plaque HD" toothpaste was related to a drop in inflammation levels (but this could have been coincidental), but it did not investigate if this had any long-term effects on cardiovascular outcomes such

    • 02 DEC 16
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    ‘Not enough over-50s’ taking aspirin to prevent heart disease

    "Aspirin a day could dramatically cut cancer and heart disease risk … study claims," the Mail Online reports. U.S. researchers ran a simulation of what might happen if all Americans over 50 years old took aspirin on a daily basis. Their results found that people would live about four months longer on average, adding 900,000

    • 01 DEC 16
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    ‘No need to wait to try again after miscarriage’ advice

    "Women who suffer a miscarriage should try for a baby again within six months, a major study has found," the Daily Mail reports. Current guidance from the World Health Organization recommends couples wait at least six months before trying to conceive again after a miscarriage. But the researchers decided to investigate the validity of this

    • 08 OCT 16
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    ‘No link’ between night shifts and breast cancer risk

    "Working night shifts has ‘little or no effect’ on a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer, new research suggests," BBC News reports. This was the finding of a new study looking at data from 10 different countries. The review pooled the evidence of three large UK-based studies, each of which found no significant link between